Channel Islands Beach Community Services District

Thank You CIBCSD

UPDATED July 14th 2017

The Channel Islands Beach Community Services District
allowed HBCA and the Developer to present to the board on Tuesday, June 27th

TOPIC: Channel Islands Harbor Developments
This is the letter sent following the presentations [Click Here for PDFCIBCSD_Letter-to-CCC_July_14_2017]
From: Channel Islands Beach Community Services District; Dated: July 14 2017; To: The Coastal Commission, City of Oxnard (Mayor and City Council); Ventura County Board of Supervisors.

This is the video of the meeting – thanks to KADYTV!

  • Proposed Massive 400 apartments at Fisherman’s Wharf
  • 55 feet high, Two city blocks long
  • Surrounded by a wall 18.5 feet high
  • 1,000 more cars at Victoria and
    Channel Islands Blvd.

More about HBCA

HBCA_logo_500 This group needs your support for keeping the harbor VISITOR SERVING and PUBLIC LAND FOR PUBLIC USE!
CLICK FOR MORE INFO

100% of funds donated to HBCA are used to pay consultant and an attorney fees.
ALL other costs for mailing, printing, administration, posters, presentations, etc are donated by volunteers.


The Harbor & Beach Community Alliance (HBCA) is not a 501(c)3 nor any type of corporation. It is a loosely organized grassroots community group and can endorse any candidate and take positions on issues. However, HBCA does not and has not fundraised for any candidate or political party or contributed any monies to a political candidate.

HBCA only fundraises to oppose the Fisherman’s Wharf Apartment Project per the Public Works Plan Amendment 7, a public interest issue.

Western Alliance for Nature is a different and separate organization and separate from any of HBCA’s activities other than it has allowed HBCA for this public interest issue to fundraise through their 501(c)3 corporation. The Western Alliance for Nature does not endorse candidates and has taken no position on this or any other election issues.


July 12 2017 Update City of Oxnard on Fisherman’s Wharf

The Oxnard City Council met in Council Chambers on July 11, 2017. Prior to the Regular Meeting scheduled for 6:00 PM, the Council met in Closed Session 4:30 PM

Prior to the closed session the items to be discussed were reported by the mayor. The item regarding Ventura County and Channel Islands Harbor Properties LLC., threat to sue the city concerning the proposed development at Fisherman’s Wharf was mentioned. (5:45 – on the video) The reference to this item was referred to as having potential Potential Litigation CC On the advice of the City Attorney, pursuant to Government Code section 54956.9(d)(2), based on existing facts and circumstances, there is significant exposure to litigation against the City in one potential case. The City Attorney requested that this item be discussed in closed session under the Brown Act exception of Conference with Legal Counsel – Anticipated Litigation.

Report by Mayor Flynn City Council Meeting July 11,2017 following closed session: (9:07 on the video)

Steve Fisher:
Regarding closed session item 4 Ventura County and Channel Islands Harbor Properties LLC Threat to sue the city concerning the proposed development at Fisherman’s Wharf the City Council deliberated on that matter and instructed the City Manager to send a letter to the Harbor director and the County CEO stating the cities position.

Documents reference Proposed Settlement Offer of July 6, 2017 and City Response of July 12, 2017 Regarding Proposed Fisherman’s Wharf
Project:

REF:
4. Conference with Legal Counsel – Potential Litigation CC On the advice of the City Attorney, pursuant to Government Code section 54956.9(d)(2), based on existing facts and circumstances, there is significant exposure to litigation against the City in one potential case.
The City Attorney requested that this item be discussed in closed session under the Brown Act exception of Conference with Legal Counsel – Anticipated Litigation.


More about HBCA

HBCA_logo_500 This group needs your support for keeping the harbor VISITOR SERVING and PUBLIC LAND FOR PUBLIC USE!
CLICK FOR MORE INFO

100% of funds donated to HBCA are used to pay consultant and an attorney fees.
ALL other costs for mailing, printing, administration, posters, presentations, etc are donated by volunteers.


The Harbor & Beach Community Alliance (HBCA) is not a 501(c)3 nor any type of corporation. It is a loosely organized grassroots community group and can endorse any candidate and take positions on issues. However, HBCA does not and has not fundraised for any candidate or political party or contributed any monies to a political candidate.

HBCA only fundraises to oppose the Fisherman’s Wharf Apartment Project per the Public Works Plan Amendment 7, a public interest issue.

Western Alliance for Nature is a different and separate organization and separate from any of HBCA’s activities other than it has allowed HBCA for this public interest issue to fundraise through their 501(c)3 corporation. The Western Alliance for Nature does not endorse candidates and has taken no position on this or any other election issues.


INCO Board Meetings – Harbor Presentations by HBCA and Developers

City of OXNARD

Updated with Letter from INCO on May 9th 2017

INCO Board Meetings – Harbor Presentations by HBCA and Developers

HBCA has retained consultants and specialists to review documents and procedures in regard to the proposed development at Fisherman’s Wharf.

On Feb 1, 2017 HBCA presented to INCO on the development proposed for Fisherman’s Wharf in Channel Islands harbor.
The presentation indicated that the proposed development presents many inconsistencies to policies in the City of Oxnard’s Local Coastal Plan (LCP).

The board of INCO thanked the presenters and made and passed a motion to invite the developers to present at a future meeting.

On March 1, 2017 the developers responded with a presentation thanking the board for the opportunity to respond.

There were many questions and comments following both presentations.

The INCO board voted unanimously at the end of the meeting on March 1st to send a letter to the City and the County opposing the development.

In the event the links below do not work please see: https://www.oxnard.org/inco-archived-agendas-and-minutes/

I have re-posted the following in order – March 1st was the first presentation and Feb 1st was the developer response.

Inter-Neighborhood Council Organization Feb 1, 2017 (Includes HBCA presentation) Agenda Video
Inter-Neighborhood Council Organization Mar 1, 2017 (Includes Developer response to HBCA presentation) Agenda Video

May 9 2017, INCO presents the letter in opposition to the project.

See all BOS Agendas upcoming and archived meeting videos:
http://www.ventura.org/bos-archives/agendas-documents-and-broadcasts

Note: May 9 2017 fast forward to 27:21 if you want to see only this.
http://ventura.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=67&clip_id=4650

About INCO

The Inter Neighborhood Council Organization (INCO)

The Oxnard City Council initiated the Inter-Neighborhood Council Organization (INCO) to give residents the opportunity to participate in governmental decision-making processes.

The INCO encourages Oxnard residents to form neighborhood councils to address issues and needs that are important to community members.

The INCO, in turn, serves as an advocacy group for each of the neighborhood councils. The INCO is made up of the chairpersons of each active neighborhood council, ensuring that residents from each neighborhood have a voice.

The INCO assists the neighborhood councils in communicating with the Oxnard City Council and City staff, and helps the neighborhood councils achieve their objectives.

The INCO holds meetings the first Wednesday of each month, serving as a forum for neighborhood council participants. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. at the City Council Chambers, 305 W. Third St.

The INCO meetings are broadcast live on Oxnard CityWatch Television. Time Warner Cable subscribers can watch the meetings on Channel 10, and Frontier Communications customers can tune in to Channel 35.


More about HBCA

HBCA_logo_500 This group needs your support for keeping the harbor VISITOR SERVING and PUBLIC LAND FOR PUBLIC USE!
CLICK FOR MORE INFO

100% of funds donated to HBCA are used to pay consultant and an attorney fees.
ALL other costs for mailing, printing, administration, posters, presentations, etc are donated by volunteers.


The Harbor & Beach Community Alliance (HBCA) is not a 501(c)3 nor any type of corporation. It is a loosely organized grassroots community group and can endorse any candidate and take positions on issues. However, HBCA does not and has not fundraised for any candidate or political party or contributed any monies to a political candidate.

HBCA only fundraises to oppose the Fisherman’s Wharf Apartment Project per the Public Works Plan Amendment 7, a public interest issue.

Western Alliance for Nature is a different and separate organization and separate from any of HBCA’s activities other than it has allowed HBCA for this public interest issue to fundraise through their 501(c)3 corporation. The Western Alliance for Nature does not endorse candidates and has taken no position on this or any other election issues.


Sept 29, 2016 CHANNEL ISLANDS HARBOR TASK FORCE

CHANNEL ISLANDS HARBOR TASK FORCE
SPECIAL MEETING

special_meeting_sept-29th-6pm_pac

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 6:00pm

Oxnard Performing Arts & Convention Center (PACC)
Oxnard Room
800 Hobson Way
Oxnard, CA 93030

A. Roll Call

B. Public Comments

At a special meeting, a person may address the Task Force only on matters on the agenda. The presiding officer shall limit public comments to three minutes. Unless otherwise approved by the Task Force, persons wishing to speak on items on the agenda should do so during public comments.

C. New Business

1. 2030 General Plan’s Urban Village designation at Fisherman’s Wharf – Update on the process for implementation of the 2030 General Plan’s Urban Village designation at Fisherman’s Wharf, including an amendment to the City’s Local Coastal Plan to incorporate a specific or strategic plan for Fisherman’s Wharf.

D. Adjournment

SHOW UP – GET YOUR NEIGHBORS TO SHOW UP!

Here is the information sheet from the City: 20160929_agenda_cihtf_mtg_special

If you can not attend email the Mayor timbflynn@gmail.com with your concerns!

Print this flyer and pass out to everyone on your block! CLICK HERE FOR FLYER: pac_sept-29-2016-meeting

Ten Key Principles of the Urban Village

Ten Key Principles of the Urban Village

  1. Walkability

Most things are within a 10 minute walk of home and work

Pedestrian friendly street design

Pedestrian streets free of cars in special cases

 

  1. Connectivity

Interconnected street grid network disperses traffic & eases walking

A hierarchy of narrow streets, boulevards, and alleys

High quality pedestrian network and public realm makes walking pleasurable

 

  1. Mixed-Use & Diversity

A mix of shops, offices, services recreational activities, apartments, and homes

Mixed-use within neighborhoods, within blocks, and within buildings

Diversity of people – of ages, income levels, cultures, races and lifestyles

 

  1. Mixed Housing

A range of types, sizes and prices in closer proximity, such as:

Cottages; Single family detached and attached; Multi-family; Accessory; Upper floor rentals

over retail; Condominiums

 

  1. Quality Architecture & Urban Design

Emphasis on beauty, aesthetics, human comfort, and creating a sense of place

Special placement of civic uses and sites within community

Human scale architecture & attractive surroundings nourish the human spirit

 

  1. Traditional Neighborhood Structure

Discernable center and edge

Public space at center, and quality public realm

Public open space designed as civic art

Contains a range of uses and densities within 10-minute walk

 

  1. Increased Density

More buildings, residences, shops, and services closer together

New Urbanism design principles are applied at the full range of densities

 

  1. Smart Transportation

A network of high-quality public transit connecting cities, towns, and neighborhoods together

Design that encourages a greater use of bicycles, rollerblades, scooters, and walking as daily transportation

 

  1. Sustainability

Minimal environmental impact of development and its operations

Eco-friendly technologies, respect for ecology and value of natural systems

More efficient use of public infrastructure and services

Energy efficiency

More walking, less driving

 

  1. Quality of Life

Taken together, these principles add up to a high quality of life well worth living, and create places that enrich, uplift, and inspire the human spirit.

Oxnard Fisherman’s Wharf Redevelopment Hits Coastal Commission Snag: Citizens Journal 9-5-16

Added by Citizen Reporter on September 5, 2016.

By Tim Pompey

The current redevelopment proposal for Fisherman’s Wharf, managed by the Ventura County Harbor Department, and in cooperation with developers Geoff Palmer,Tom Tellefsen & Peter Mullen of Channel Islands Properties, LLC, has been delayed by the California Coastal Commission, primarily over concerns about conflicts with current Oxnard city zoning ordinances and questions regarding the County’s proposed traffic management study. Read: CCC incomplete PWP-4-CIH-16-0005-2

The proposed plan is to build 390 apartments and add 37,000 feet of commercial retail space along the Channel Islands and Victoria corridor. The apartments would include one level of underground parking and three stories of housing …

CLICK TO READ ON CITIZENS JOURNAL!!


CLICK FOR INFO and to donate:

Say No to 390 apartments!

Oxnard PROJECTED LAND USE

The following information can be found on the Ciy of Oxnard siteFINAL DRAFT – December 2015 https://www.oxnard.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/PM-1.3.pdf (which at the time of this posting is under a bit a construction)
POPULATION AND LAND USE ESTIMATES

1.0 INTRODUCTION
This Project Memorandum (PM) outlines the sources and process used for the population and land use estimates in this Public Works Integrated Master Plan (PWIMP). All documents developed as part of this PWIMP are based on the population and land use estimated discussed herein.

1.1 PMs Used for Reference

The estimates outlined in this PM are made in concert with recommendations and analyses from other related PMs:
• PM 1.1 – Overall – Master Planning Process Overview.
• PM 2.1 – Water System – Background Summary.
• PM 3.1 – Wastewater System – Background Summary.
• PM 4.1 – Recycled System – Background Summary.
• PM 5.1 – Stormwater System – Background Summary.

1.2 Other Reports Used for Reference
In developing the population and land use estimates in this PWIMP, recommendations from other reports were incorporated to ensure a well-rounded and holistic look at the water, wastewater, stormwater, and recycled water systems. The following reports are used in this PWIMP analysis:
• City of Oxnard 2030 General Plan, Development Services Department Planning Division, October 2011 (City of Oxnard General Plan, 2011).
• City of Oxnard 2030 General Plan Background Report, Development Services Department Planning Division, April 2006 (City of Oxnard Background Report, 2006).
• 2010 Census Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ), Southern California Association of Governments, (TAZ, 2010).
• 2014 Population Estimates, California Department of Finance (DOF), (DOF, 2014).

2.0 EXISTING LAND USES

The City’s 2030 General Plan was most recently updated in 2011 and was amended in September 2014. The City’s 2030 General Plan defines many elements of land use, including the distribution of land use types and near-term and long-range development plans.
In 1998, the City adopted the Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources (SOAR) initiative and established the City Urban Restriction Boundary (CURB) (City of Oxnard General Plan, 2011). The CURB defines the boundary in which urban development is permissible by the City of Oxnard. The SOAR initiative is set to expire in 2020, but voters will have the opportunity to extend the SOAR initiative. As discussed with the City Planning Department, the City believes that expiration of the SOAR initiative and voter-approved development beyond the CURB is highly unlikely in the near future and is reflected in the 2030 General Plan. The land use categories described in the general plan are described in detail and assigned a corresponding water use classification are listed in Table 1.

Figure 1
TABLE 1

3.0 PROJECTED LAND USE

The City’s 2030 General Plan presents the planned land use types for the projected land use condition of the City’s service area in 2030.
The build-out year in the City’s 2030 General Plan is 2030. The year 2014 population is 203,645 (DOF, 2014). The projected population by year 2030 ranges from 259,544 to 329,322 depending on the forecasting scenario used from the City’s General Plan. As shown in Table 2, the population growth is expected to be 37,278.

One significant development anticipated in the northeast of the City’s service area is the Sakioka Farm Specific Plan. The Sakioka Farm Specific Plan is a new business park and industrial development. In addition, the Village Plan entails the redevelopment of residential area, while the South Shore Specific and Teal Club Specific Plans are comprised of a combination of new residential, commercial, and/or industrial space within the City.

Significant amounts of redevelopment opportunities remain in the downtown area around City Hall along the Oxnard Boulevard corridor.
In addition to the developments described above, there is also discussion for development of the South Ormond Beach region. The University of California expressed interest in the development of a research campus which would consist of a light industrial land use category. However, due to the uncertainty of this development, this PWIMP does not consider this land use conversion.

The City’s planning department identified several developments that are either currently under construction or planned to be implemented in the (near) future. The location of these developments were confirmed using Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) population and employment data along with GIS data to identify locations of these developments (TAZ, 2010). Major developments that were identified by the City’s planning department are listed in Table 2. Additionally, infill developments were also located by identifying growth within each TAZ and vacant parcels with the appropriate land use category where development may occur (Figure 1).

As shown in Table 2, the largest population increases are anticipated to be due to residential infill and mixed use development. Specific developments that will trigger significant growth include Riverpark, The Village, and potentially the South Shore and Teal Club Specific Plans.
Table 2 Future Developments:

Table 2 Future Developments
Table 2 Future Developments

4.0 PROJECTED POPULATION

The City’s most recent General Plan (GP) was adopted in 2011 and includes a population forecast through year 2030. The GP includes four projections that are “projections bookends” that each start with the 2005 city population of 192,232. Using a variety of assumptions, four growth scenarios were developed that resulted in a population forecast ranging from 238,996 to 285,521 for year 2030. These two bookends are further referred to as the low and high forecasts of the 2030 GP. Details regarding the different assumptions and forecasts can be found in Section 2.6 and Table 2.2 of the City’s General Plan
Background Report (City of Oxnard Background Report, 2006).

NEAR TERM DEVELOPMENTS
NEAR TERM DEVELOPMENTS

The GP population projections were based on data from the years preceding the nation-wide recession that started in 2008. The subsequent recession resulted in a reduction in anticipated growth in the intervening years. Therefore, this population forecast was updated by the City’s planning department in 2014 in response to SCAG’s data request for the Regional Transportation Plan’s 2040 population forecast. This 2014 forecast is based on the 2010 Census and housing projections by TAZ.

The 2010 Census reported a City population of 197,889. In addition, the housing count from developments constructed between 2010 and 2014 were used, as well as the housing projections from other planned developments in the City. The City Planning Department assumed a vacancy rate of 5 percent among dwelling units and an average high-end household size of 4 for each occupied unit within the City in their forecast. The population forecasts from the 2030 GP as well as the City’s planning department update prepared in 2014 are summarized in Table 3 and graphically shown on Figure 2.

Table 3
Table 3

NEW PETITION TO CALIFORNIA COASTAL COMMISSION

Ventura County Board of Supervisors have approved a proposal to place a 390 high density, 55ft high luxury apartment complex on Fisherman’s Wharf. The Board of Supervisors ignored a petition of 3700 signatures opposed to the project which will use public lands for private exploitation. This project works against the California Coastal Act in these ways:

  • Reduced Public Access and Use: Boat Launch/ RV Parking(4 acres) and access to park and walkway
  • No Environmental Impact Report
  • Piecemeal Planning and Lack of Vision
  • GATED Complex on Public Land for Private profit
  • Inappropriate Use of Public Land donated for the purpose of providing a harbor for public
  • Reduced Public Safety (traffic, evacuation, rescue)
  • Inadequate Traffic Study
  • Building heights (55 ft.) blocks public view corridor

As concerned citizens we urge the California Coastal Commission to uphold the California Coastal Act of 1976 and your mission of

“protecting and enhancing California’s coast and ocean for present and future generations”

Please DENY this proposal and DEMAND a full Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and DEMAND that Ventura County Board of Supervisors find a better use for this public land to serve the people of Ventura County by involving citizens in creating a joint vision for our public land.

PROPOSAL TO SAVE OVERNIGHT RV and BOATING AT FISHERMAN’S WHARF

PROPOSAL TO SAVE OVERNIGHT RV and BOATING AT FISHERMAN’S WHARF Fisherman’s Wharf in the Channel Islands Harbor is a beautiful location for camping, and the only public boat launch in the area. RV’ers willingly pay $45 per night to park, with no amenities in order to enjoy access to the harbor and public beaches. Boaters park trailers overnight in this location as well.

The proposal by the Harbor Dept. and Channel Islands Harbor Properties LLC was approved by the VC Board of Supervisors and has been submitted to the California Coastal Commission for approval. The gated 390 unit complex that will make access to public land impossible for RVs, boat trailers and other vehicles by reducing the space available for parking, DENYING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PUBLIC LAND.

We request that the County Board of Supervisors revisit the decision to build the 55 foot tall, high- density apartments and increase PUBLIC AMENITIES for RV’s and boaters on the PUBLIC LAND. This land was donated to the County for the recreational use by the PUBLIC, not for Private Profit.

We appeal to the California Coastal Commission to uphold the California Coastal Act of 1976, and your mission of

protecting and enhancing California’s coast and ocean for present and future generations…

WHY NEEDED?

  • Within 60 miles north and south of FW, there are only 5 RV parks (635 sites) with full hook ups, and 4 parks with no hookups
  • Loss of McGrath State Beach (172 sites)
  • FW parking lot is full on 4th of July and utilized every weekend of summer, with NO hookups, NO amenities and NO marketing
  • An excellent location/destination away from freeway, with harbor access, close to family beaches

WHAT AMENITIES/SERVICES WOULD SERVE VISITORS AS WELL AS COMMUNITY?

  • Family type restaurants (like Toppers Pizza- extremely successful)
  • Small grocery/deli
  • Novelty stores/shops
  • Community theatre (ELITE already there)
  • Cafes – coffee, ice cream, donuts (already there)
  • Water taxi to take Visitors to other restaurants in harbor
  • Kayak, bike, small boat rentals, surreys and segways
  • Island Packers excursions to islands or whale watching – “The Gateway to the Channel Islands National Park”
  • Shuttle to beaches – Hollywood, Silver Strand, Kiddie Beach
  • Picnic areas, public restrooms
  • A Destination Themed restaurant (e.g.Aquarium )
  • Educational Sea Center (already there- Oxnard College) for families to enjoy

Pdf of this page: Alternative-to-apartments_fishermans-wharf

PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD!

Who is developing the in Channel Islands Harbor?

Casa Sirena and Lobster Trap

http://www.channelislandsharbor.org/Casa%20Sirena.html

The Public Works Amendment (PWPA6) adopted by the Board of Supervisors on March 22, 2016 has went for a hearing before the California Coastal Commission on July 14, 2016, at the County Administration Building in San Diego, California.

Brighton Management, operating as Bright Peninsula Road, is in a Lease Option Agreement with the County of Ventura to pursue replacement of the hotel and restaurant. During the Lease Option Agreement, Bright will be working to obtain approvals from the California Coastal Commission and other public agencies, complete building design, and obtain building permits. The Lease Option Agreement calls for a 205-room hotel and a 5,000 + square foot restaurant. Meeting space will be contained within the hotel.

This seems like a positive move and has been met with great enthusiasm by the residents nearby as well as all over Oxnard!

FISHERMAN’s WHARF DEVELOPMENT

This development has not been met with the same enthusiasm.

This development includes a facelift to the existing dilapidated Fisherman’s Wharf plus the addition of a HUGE high end apartment complex which will eliminate the existing RV parking and create a traffic night mare on Victoria and Channel Islands Blvd.

The County is trying to pass this off as an Urban Village – targeted to appeal to millennials – THIS would not be an Urban Village – but rather would remove precious public access to our Harbor on land that was intended for PUBLIC ACCESS.

http://www.channelislandsharbor.org/Fisherman’s%20Wharf.html

Article about the developer:

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/08/geoffrey-palmer-trump-donor-los-angeles-214130

LOS ANGELES—The buildings have names like “Lorenzo” and “Medici,” usually plastered across the five-story stucco edifices in oversized Papyrus font cutouts made of bronze. They’re decorated with columns and fountains and details that architecture critics dismissively call “fauxtalian.” As this city has become more pedestrian-friendly and conscious of its street life, the buildings are deliberately walled off, with skyways to keep residents away from any homeless people they might encounter on the sidewalks below.

They have one developer’s name behind them: Geoffrey Palmer.

Article about the developer:

The Faux-talian fortress developer has donated $2 million to a Super PAC backing the candidate

By Elijah Chiland Jul 18, 2016, 12:07p

Donald Trump’s Biggest Donor Is Notorious LA Developer Geoff Palmer – Curbed LA

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has had trouble courting donors for a while now, but Beverly Hills-based developer and prominent water waster Geoff Palmer is fully on board. In fact, Palmer is Trump’s biggest individual donor, Bloomberg reports.

Federal Election Commission data shows Palmer gave $2 million to a Super PAC supporting Trump known as Rebuilding America Now. The PAC was started by fellow Los Angeles developer Tom Barrack, though Barrack himself has yet to invest any of his own money into it, leaving Palmer’s donation as the bulk of the $2.16 million in the PAC’s coffers.

The money seems to be going to good use; in only the last 24 hours the PAC has uploaded four new campaign ads to its Youtube account, including this doozy:

Also see: http://la.curbed.com/2016/2/18/11080104/los-angeles-developer-lawsuit-downtown-fire

THIS IS WHO IS BEHIND THIS DEVELOPMENT:
Do you want this in your harbor?